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The Crescent 



VOLUME XXXV 



NEWBERG, OREGON. APRIL 30, 1924 



NUMBER 11 



J 



P. C. DEFEATS ALBANY 
HERE ON CAMPUS DAY 

Pirates Unable to Hold Pacific's 
Ball Tossers 



A real treat wag prepared for the 
industrious workers who cleaned up 
the campus on Campus Day, Friday, 
April 25, when Coach Michener's 
men tamed the Albany Pirates in 
the first scheduled game of the sea- 
son. The Pirates came here with 
blood in their eyes, but the end of 
the third inning gave some indica- 
tion of their losing game, and the 
final score of 19 to 8. The newly 
scraped diamond was in fine condi- 
tion for the game. 

At a little after 3 o'clock Dr. 
Ralph Root called the game, with 
Albany at bat. A clean single led 
off, followed by a grounder to right 
field which finally brought in 2 
runs. Two easy outs fielded by the 
pitcher, with the next man kept 
from hitting, gave our men a turn 
at bat. With two down Swak gained 
first on a pop fly. Everest succeed- 
en in reaching third on an over- 
throw to first, and the next hit 
brought in the second run. Each 
team scored 1 in the next inning. 

After Albany had scored 1 in the 
third, P. C. started the merry-go- 
round in earnest. With one down, 
a series of steady hits, four of which 
were singles, brought in 5 easy 
runs. Three bases were stolen in 
this event. 

The next three innings showed lit- 
tle more than routine play. Albany 
changed pitchers in the fifth, to lit- 
le, if any advantage. Woodward, 
however, had settled down in the 
fourth inning and maintained his 
steady pitching througout the re- 
mainder of the game. It was not at 
all a one-sided pitcher's battle as 
some had expected. 

Pacific's 6 point lead was sub- 
stantially cut down when Albany 
rolled up 4 more in the first few 
minutes of the seventh. But they 
had started something which P. C. 
finished by winning 9 in the second 
half of the inning. With no outs 
and 2 scores Dick Everest brought 
in 2 more with a lusty three-bagger 
to a vacant left field. Another run 
and two outs followed. Gus Hanke 
gained second on a short fly to left 
field, and with two more singles 
scored another. Bill Sweet added 
the finishing touches to this by 
knocking a home run into the brush 
in left field, bringing in two men 
ahead of him. 

The icniaining two innings wire 
nothing more than a rapid ';-ji,e°s- 
sion of outs on easy plays, leaving 
the total score at 19 for Pacific and 
8 for Albany. 

Consistent team work, with 
steady dependable effort at all times 
and with Just enough flashy plays 
to add variety, was Michener's or- 
ders of the day. 
P. C. 

C 
P 

ss 

IB 
2B 



Indian Operetta Presented Before Large 
Audience by Pacific Ladies Glee Club 



The long anticipated Indian oper- 
etta, "Hiawatha's Childhood," by 
Bessie M. Whitely, was presented in 
the evening of Monday, April 14 in 
Wood-Mar hall, by the Ladies' Glee 
Club of Pacific College. The girls, 
under the able direction of Professor 
Alexander Hull, had worked on the 
operetta since the beginning of the 
school year, thus, by the conscienti- 
ous effort put forth, assuring a le- 
lightful evening's entertainment. 

In opening the program, Mr. Hull 
gave an interesting explanantion of 
the Indian melodies used in the op- 
eretta and of Indian music in gen- 
eral. To illustrate the peculiar 
theme of the Indian lyrics, he played 
several selections on the piano, both 
in the original and in the revised 
form. Mr. Hull then sang two pleas- 
ing numbers, "The Land of the Sky- 
blue Waters," and "The Moon Drops 
I Low," both by Cadman. 

The operetta was presented in an 
I artistically decorated stage setting. 
A wigwam, a campfire, Indian blan- 
kets and baskets, fir trees and num- 
erous other properties suggested the 
primitive life of the red man. The 
girls themselves and little Charles 
Hodson, who played Hiawatha, were 
clothed in representative garments. 

The first appearance of the girls 
was an Indian war dance, followed 
by the chorus number, "By the 
Shores of Gitchie Gumee." "Ewa- 
yea" was sung as a solo number by 
Eva Miles. Then followed a weird 
phantom scene in which Florence 
Heater as the witch woman, Emma- 
belle Woodworth repres e n t i n g 
spring, Mary Elliott in the role of a 
deer, and Helen Hester as the hunt- 
er, pleased the audience with their 
characterizations in the blue dusk 



of twilight (rendered by a few sin 
gle twists of Mr. Hull's wrist), 
while the chorus off-stage sang the 
"Wind Song." The last number in 
this group was "At the Door"by th'> 
entire chorus. 

The second group of selections of 
the operetta began in the "hand- 
made twilight." As an "A" number 
of this group, Esther Haworth sang 
the solo, "Wah-wah-taysee." Follow- 
ing this was a pretty "Firefly 
Dance," in which Rose Ellen Hale, 
Bernice Hinshaw, Hilma Hendrick- 
son and Helen Nordyke were the 
"little, dancing, white-fire crea- 
tures," dressed in filmy tarlatan and 
flashing little flashlights which 
gave the unique firefly effect. With 
"daylight" again, the chorus sang, 
"Saw the Moon" and "Then the Lit- 
tle Hiawatha." 

The first number of the third and 
last group was a solo by Helen Hes- 
ter entitled "Go My Son," during 
which, as Iagoo the great hunter and 
boaster, she presented to Hiawatha, 
his first bow and arrows, and sent 
him forth to hunt. Then the chorus 
sang four ensemble numbers: "All 
Alone," "And the Birds Sang," with 
*a beautiful violin obligato by Clif- 
ton Parrett, "Then Upon One Knee" 
and "Strongheart." 

At several places in the operetta 
different members recited fitting 
lines from Longfellow's "Hiawatha," 
thus giving a suitable background 
for the songs. Mrs. Hull played the 
accompaniments for the operetta. 

This Indian operetta is the largest 
and most successful attempt of the 
Pacific College music department in 
recent years and stands out as an- 
other of the many triumphs of the 
Hulls. 



1 



Everest 
Woodward 
Armstrong 
Sweet 
Rinard 
Rinard 



Albany 
Densmore 
Uhnhammer 
Mason 
Drager 
Van Winkle 



3B Tate (Lawrence) 



ORIENTAL ATMOSPHERE 

IS BANQUET FEATURE 

Annual Junior-Senior Banquet Held 
At Wood-Mar Hall 



MAY DAY FESTIVITIES 

PROMISE GREAT CHARM 



Wood-Mar hall was the scene of a 
very beautifully picturesque oriental 
setting Saturday evening, April 19, 
when the annual banquet for the 
Seniors was given by the membei's 
of the Junior class. President and 
Mrs. Pennington being honored 
guests. The appealing atmosphere 
of old Japan and China was skillful- 
ly materialized in decorations of 
lattice work interwoven with ivy 
and flowering wisteria, screens, 
Japanese lanterns, incense and ori- 
ental music. 

The menu and toast program were 
neatly printed in fan-shaped book- 
lets, embelished with Japanese char- 
acters, while the place cards consist- 
ed of small lanterns hung from cute 
little parasols supported in the dain- 



(Continued on page two) 



Elliott RF Stewart (Hatch) 

Hanke CF McDonald 

Lienard LF Cox 

Score by innings: 
P.C. 21510190- 
A.O. 211000400 



May third is to be a big day in 
the old home town. It is then that 
May Day, with all its gay festivities, 
has promised us a visit. Every other 
year Pacific College conducts a May 
j Day Program, and as this is Pacific's 
year, many busy people are to be 
, found around school talking and 
, planning for the "big day." Judg- 
ing from the interest shown by stu- 
dents and faculty, the affair certain- 
, ly shall be worth attending. 
I The first thing on the program 
I will be a floral parade, which starts 
| from the college. It will proceed 
south to First street, west to Main, 
and then back to the college. At the 
head of the procession the queen in 
all her splendor, will ride in a mag- 
nificently decorated float. This pa- 
rade should be a success, for all the 
classes of the college and academy, 
as well as the commercial depart- 
ment and faculty, are entering floats 
! in competition for the possession of, 
for two years, and the privilege of 
having its initials engraved on, a 
silver loving cup. It is hoped that 
I the business organizations of New- 
i berg will also be well represented in 
the parade, especially since Linfield 



(Continued on page three) 



CAMPUS DAY SEES BIG 
CLEANUP AT PACIFIC 

Ten Committees Attack Job of Put- 
ting Campus in Order 

Whether looking at it from the 
side of the amount of work accom- 
plished or from the pleasure enjoyed 
campus day was a decided success. 
Classes were forgotten all last Fri- 
day in the enthusiasm shown all 
over the campus. 

Miss Sutton and Alfred Everest 
saw to it that the myriad of work- 
ers under their supervision were 
kept busy digging around the shrubs 
and flower beds on the front cam- 
pus, picking up all the rubbish that 
had accumulated, and cleaning the 
grass from the side of the walks and 
j sweeping the walks. They also put 
I in a new flowerbed near the en- 
I trance of the driveway, which they 
hope will yield some roses sometime 
! in the near future. Then, as Spud 
says, they tried to fill in a few of 
the unnecssary ruts in the "auxil- 
iary driveways." 

Inside of the college building, Al- 
bert Windell's committee accom- 
plished some very noticeable im- 
| provements. The seats in the chapel 
were all refastened, the rubber 
strips on the stairs were again nall- 
! ed down, all the pictures were dust- 
, ed, and the windows washed. While 
| all this was being done, Miss Clark 
and her workers were cleaning and 
I dusting in the library and stack- 
| room, and the "zoo" lab was being 
: thoroughly overhauled. 

Did you know a new cement ten- 
j nis court had been added to our 
I campus? Well, it hasn't, but the 
faculty court might easily be mis- 
j taken for such after Benny and Pol- 
ly scraped and swept it so faith- 
| fully. The backstops were patched 
and mended so it is hoped they will 
now stop the majority of balls they 
meet. 

Although the chem. lab. had not 
a special committee appointed to fix 
it up, Helen Hester solicited the aid 
of several willing folks, and with 
their help, succeeded in .making that 
place look different. Windows were 
washed and all the shelves and bot- 
tles in the building were cleaned 
and straightened up. 

One of the jobs that most needed 
to be done on the back campus was 
to mend the wobbly sidewalk, and 
Ben Darling had the fellows on his 
committee fixing that first thing. 
Meanwhile, the girls raked leaves, 
dug around flower beds and super- 
vised the job of training up one of 
the rosebushes in front of the dorm. 
The wood piles in back of the col- 
lege buildings also witnessed some 
raking of chips and cleaning up 
around them. 

Some of the members of the Acad- 
emy committee, with Miss Lee and 
George Foott as chairman, discover- 
ed that there was a large surface of 
white woodwork in that building 
that had to be washed. All of the 
windows were washed. and the 
seats in the study hall were more 
firmly anchored to the floor. But 

I (Continued on page three) 



THE CRESCENT 



Entered as second-clasa mail matter 
at Postofflce at Newberg, Ore. 



Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 



EDITORIAL 

Editor-in-chief Florence Lee 

Assoi e E-Mti . . . .Ivor Jones 

Departmental ibuitui- 

Helen Robertson 

Faculty Advisor R. W. Lewis 

REPORTORIAL 
Society — Edna Doree; Sports — 
Howard Nottage; Personals — Flor- 
ence Heater; Y. W. C. A. — -Iris Hew- 
itt; Y. M. C. A.— Ralph Hester; 
Chapel — Emma Fort; Trefian — Hel- 
en Robertson ; Commercial — Kath 
erine Pettingil; Alumni — Miss 
Britt. 

MANAGERIAL 
Business Manager. . .Floyd Lienard 
Circulation Manager, Wilbur Elliott 



Terms; fl.00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 



MAY DAY AS AN ASSET TO 
PACIFIC 

The benefits of a May Day festi- 
val for Pacific cannot be measured 
in words. To the indifferent specta- 
tor it is a thing of beauty, to be 
sure, but after all, perhaps, only 
frivolity and a waste of time. But 
to those who have an interest in Pa- 
cific College and a love for the fruits 
of educational advancement, it spells 
a worth-while accomplishment— 
something well done — a monument 
to undisputed ability in management 
and execution. 

How often one resents the extra 
labor it requires! But, oh the sweet 
sense of satisfaction in having been 
instrumental in putting across a big 
success. The discipline required 
alone is "worth its weight in gold" 
for the genuine training for the tru- 
ly large undertakings in life it af- 
fords. However, it is not alone the. 
individual who is benefitted — Pa- 
cific enjoys a benefit just- one hun- 
dred and fifty times as great. For 
the institution that acquires a rep- 
utation for DOING things, holds an 
irresistible attraction for the stu- 
dent who sincerely desires to devel- 
op his ability to accomplish. 



TALK AND EAT CLUB 

Professor Algie Newlin at the 
meeting of the Talk and Eat club 
which was held April 24 discussed 
in a masterly way the development 
of new states and new constitutions 
in Europe. The members were in- 
tensely interested as the speaker 
traced the conditions in central Eu- 
rope since the world war. He show- 
ed how that in an area from Finland 
to Greece a group of new republics 
has developed with constitutional 
governments and universal suffrage. 

In the course of his talk he called 
attention to the fact that these new 
states have to face many serious 
problems: racial antagonisms with- 
in their own borders; the hostility 
of their neighbors; the unfavorable 
agricultural conditions. Czechoslo- 
vakia, he said, is the only one of the 
new states that is really in a good 
economic condition, and has more 
than its own needs and can send out 
exports. 

A man of Europe was effectively 
»*TVl and frequent reference was 
made to a new book, the Constitu- 
tions of Europe. 



We regret very much an omission 
from the cast of "Tickless Time" In 
our last issue, the correction is here- 
with made: Mrs. Eddie Knight, 
Hilma Hendrlckson. 



CHAPEL NOTES 

During the chapel period of Fri- 
day, April 18, Floyd Leinard, Pacif- 
ic Academy's represntative in the 
Portland Telegram's Oratorical Con- 
test on the Constitution of the Unit- 
ed States, gave his oration before 
the student body. 

Speaking on "Adventures In Qua- 
kerism," John P. Fletcher of Lon- 
don, England, on Tuesday, April 22. 
gave at some length his views on the 
present social order and his experi- 
ences as a conscientious objector 
during the war. 

A considerable portion of Mr. 
Fletcher's discourse was given over 
to his experiences as religious work- 
er in Australia and New Zealand 
prior to, and during the first part of 
the war. 

Mr. Fletcher soon after the open- 
ing of the war, returned to England 
where he was confronted with the 
question of joining the army or ad- 
hering to the Quaker doctrine of 
non-resistance. The English Society 
of Friends decided that they could 
not accept exemption from service 
that would give no exemption to 
their friends of different belief. 
Neither could they accept service in 
the army. The result was convic- 
tion to prison, where a large num- 
ber of Friends were confined during 
the war. 

Mr. Fletcher has done consider- 
able writing along lines of peace and 
religion, and will lecture and visit 
in America until August, when he 
will return to England. 

The chapel period of Thursday, 
April 24, saw the awarding of let- 
ters for the football and basketball 

seasons. 

Football letters were given to the 
following men: 

Eldon Everest, half. Chosen as 
half on the Willamette Valley Con- 
ference second team. 

Floyd Lienard, center. 

Philip Haworth, guard. 

Alfred Everest, guard. 

Ralph Hester, end. 

Marion Winslow, tackle. 

George Melllnger, half. 

Homer Nordyke, half. 

Capt. Willie Saunders, quarter. 

Edgar Street, end. Chosen as end 
on the All Conference team. 

Gus Hanke, tackle. Chosen as All 
Conference tackle. 

Hubert Armstrong, fullback. 
Chosen fullback on All Conference 
team. 

Appreciative mention was given 
of Hibbs (half); Owen (half); H. 
Hester (end), who had to give up 
football on account of injuries re- 
ceived at practice, and of Chenevert; 
Stanb rough; G. Brown; and Hol- 
lingsworth. who were consistent 
"team builders" and did their part 
In putting football across. 

Letters were awarded to the fol- 
lowing men for college basketball: 

Wendell Woodward, forward. 

Paul Brown, guard. 

Capt. Hubert Armstrong, guard. 

Floyd Leinard. center. 

Harold Rinard. forward. 

Academv letters for basketball 
were awarded as follows: 

Pen Hunt'narton, forward 

Pnntain w 'lHaTi Sweet forward. 

Wilbur E'l'itt. center and guard. 

Theodore Chamberlain, guard and 
center. 

Eldon Everest, omrd. 

Ivor .Tones, o-imrd. 

Ptmlev Kendall, yell leader (spec- 
ial letter). 

Prospects for ne^t vear's athlet- 
ics are exceedtnglv bright for. with 
on" or two evcentlons. nil footbaV 
•>nrl bssketball men are exneeted 
•rnnk next vear. and in addit'on 
♦ nerp should be a host of new ma- 
terial. 

The fnnthfll schedule for npt-f- fftll 
'« already heinff mnrt°. PaMfln starts 
tne season >>v tangline- with the 
Chemawa Indians on October 17. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The cabinet girls had a get-ac- 
quainted evening last Friday when 
they met in the Y. W. room with 
their advisory board. The advisors 
for the coming year are Miss Lewis, 
Mrs. Elwood Johnson and Mrs. Wes- 
ley Boyes. The evening was spent 
playing a few games, visiting and 
hearing the enthusiastic reports 
from the cabinet girls who had at- 
tended the cabinet conference at W. 
U. a couple of weeks ago. The Y. 
W. Is very fortunate In having such 
splendid advisors, and it is hoped 
that all of the girls will make an 
effort to get acquainted with these 
women soon. 



Black 122 Office White 22 

DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



ORIENTAL ATMOSPHERE 

IS BANQUET FEATURE 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



(Continued from page one) 



ty nut cups. Buddha statuettes as 
incense burners were found here and 
there on the tables. A coll of in- 
cense suspended from a lantern in 
the center of the room attracted 
much interest, burning slowly and 
diffusing a pleasing odor. 

Four kimonoed Japanese maids, 
cute enough to be eaten alive, serv- 
ed the following menu: 
Grape fruit 
Fusan veal Okl potatoes 

Onlocht cauliflower 
Azukl peas Mikado yams 

Easter salad 
Fujiyama Glacier 
Madam Butterfly cake 
Leigo coffee Osaka nuts 
The toast program followed with 
Royal Gettmann as toastmaster. 
Those giving toatst were: Fans, 
Ben Darling; screens, Eva Miles; 
dragon, Florence Lee; incense, How- 
ard Nottage; queues, President Pen- 
nington. 



SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 
WITH ALBANY 

Bill says he doesn't see why those 
fellows couldn't find that ball. 

Wendell's smile in the first of the 
ninth saved the day, but he didn't 
know it at the time. 

Dick Is worrying because he "did- 
n't get a hit." What does he want 
for nothing? He has four runs to 
his credit. 

Speaking of bunting, Floyd says 
it's all In knowing how. 

Gus is kicking because he only 
fielded a mere .999. 

Wonder what Jones means by "a 
ten-minute man." 



THE 

Particular Housewife 

who takes keen interest in the 
meals she serves will be great- 
ly helped if she purchases her 
groceries of us. You can count 
on always getting fresher and 
a larger variety of table deli- 
cacies here. We are anxious 
to have you as a customer, 
knowing that If you try us 
once you -will come again. 

J. L. VAN BLARICOM 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 
THE REXALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



FRANK B. LAYMAN 
Attorney-at-Law 



CITY HALL 



STUDENTS— 

For the easiest shave 
and most up-to-date 
hair cut, go to 

JAMES McGUERE 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 



CREDE'S MARKET 

Our Specialty: 
Our own make of sugar cured 
hams, bacon, and bacon backs, 
lard and all kinds of sausage. 

Quality and Service Counts 



F. E. ROLLINS 
Jeweler 

Fine Watch Repairing 
Pens Straightened 

711 FIRST STREET 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



BOYS! . 

That new Student Electric 
lamp to study by. 

GIRLS! 

The "Flapper" Electric Curler. 



Larkin-Prince Hard- 
ware Co. 

Service! Service! Service! 



An Electric Washing Machine 

Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Anderson Motor 
Company 

STAR AND 
STUDEB AKER 

Sales and Service 

Associated Oil Products 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



THE P. A, ASKUS 



VOLUME I 



NUMBER 8 



THE P. A. ASKUS 

Entered in the Crescent as very 
classy matter. 

Published every time by the Cres- 
cent. 

Philip Haworth Editor 

George Poott Assoc. Ed. 

Retha Tuck«r. . . .Fourth Yr. News 

Rose Ellen Hale Third Yr. News 

Johanna Gerrits. . .Second Pr. News 

Mabel Kendall First Yr. News 

Philip Gatch Joke Editor 

Editorial Policy 

1. Get the best news, in the be3t 
style, and we'll have the best paper. 

2. Boost Pacific Academy. 

3. Back Pacific College. 

Terms: Pay for the Crescent in 
advance and you get the Askus. Buy 
a single copy and you get it anyway. 

ORATORICAL CONTEST 

Monday afternoon, April 21, : 
Floyd Lienard reprensented Pacific 
Academy in the National Oratorical | 
contest in which the private schools 
of Oregon competed. The contest . 
was held in the public library hall | 
in Portland, under the auspices of | 
the Portland Telegram, all the ora- j 
tors treating different phases of the , 
Constitution of the United States, j 
Floyd was the last of the eleven con- j 
testants to speak and he closed the , 
program with a forceful appeal for , 
loyalty to the Constitution and it* 
amendments, which was a splendid 
climax to the whole contest. Every 
oration was. of such a high class that 
scarcely any of those who went 
down from here can come to the 
same decision regarding the win- 
ners. The girl representing St. 
Mary's Academy took first prize; 
the girl form St. Helen's Hall sec- 
ond, and the boy from Mt. Angel 
was third. 

After the contest was over the ' 
Telegram entertained the orators ' 
with a banquet at the Hazelwood. 



FOURTH YEAR 

The Academy physics class is anx- 



iously awaiting the day of the an- 
nual inspection trip. The destina- 
tion is as yet undetermined but the 
Oak Grove power plant has been 
favorably considered. 

The Fourth Year English class 
pased a very enjoyable class period 
in the canyon one afternoon. The 
time was spent in reading Tenny- 
son's nature poems. We hope that 
this event may be repeated soon. 

The general impressions of part 
of the American history class that 
went to the oratorical contest in 
Portland Monday afternoon were — 
blowouts. 

Ivor — "George, you're not sup- 
posed to talk during intermission; 
you're supposed to do all that dur- 
ing the period. 

We are proud of the way Floyd 
Lienard represented P. A. in the ora- 
torical contest at Portland Monday 
afternoon. 

Extensive research work is be 
ing done in electricity and other 
branches of physics by the research 
experts, Bill Sweet and Phil Ha- 
worth. If anyone wishes this kind 
of work done, apply to the Research 
Expert Co., Physics Lab., P. C. 

We notice that in several recent 
Crsecent items, extensive accounts 
have ben given concerning the in- 
ventions or rather contraptions ot j 
Phil and William made in physici 
lab. We also notice that no account 
whatever has been given of the fine 
electroscope (which in the eyes of 
many was far superior to that of 
Phillip and William) and the elec- 
tric whirl, which Alice, Mildred and 
Emmabell labored on for so many te- 
dious hours. They were scoffed al 
and ridiculed but nothing could stoji 
their undauntless courage, and ft 
last when the results proved so s»jc- 
■cessful, the chagrin of the scoffers 
Was delightful to see. 

Students It is certainly possible 
for girls to be just as original and 
clever as boys, and let us from now ] 
on take more note of their labors ' 
and accomplishments. 

The curiosity of some people con- ' 
cerning a certain trip to Portland is 
absolutely uncalled for. 



THIRD YEAR 

The Third Year English class 
gives the Second Year English class 
a vote of thanks for the pretty pic- 
tures. 

First girl — "Yes, they are twins. 
Aren't they cute?" 

Second (dreamily): — "Which one 
is the older?" 

George (directing a game) — 
"Now all sit in a circle In your 
chairs." 

All hail the sheik of P. A. — Bill 
Sweet — or at least that's what the 
girls say. 

If anyone has a flat tire, don't 
pump it up — let Wilbur do it. 

Several squirrels have been seen 
near the Academy lately. Were they 
attracted by the nuts? 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 
V. / 



FAIR VARIETY STORE 

Wallace & Son 



We sell everything in Notions 
Come in and look around 



SECOND YEAR 

Some second years are wondering 
if we are ever going to have a pic- 
nic. The last time our plans came 
to naught as we forgot to place an 
order for sunshine; but we shall 
have to do as the little robin, "try 
again." 

Seth Oliver spent the week end in 
Portland recently. 

We are glad to have.Landon with 
us again after several days' illness. 

To those who have not yet found 
a subject to write on, the following 
are suggested: "Do pigs have 
wings?" "Why some people's feet 
are large;" "The reasons for falling 
asleep in school," etc. 

Donald Crozer and Philip Gatch 
have organized the D. C. and P. G. 
Spading company. It has proven 
very successful. 

We think the new pictures in the 
English room are lovely even though 
we did give them. Of course a great 
deal is due to Harold Smith for 
framing them so nicely. We thank 
you Harold. 



TENNIS BALLS 
Fresh from factory every month. 

Don't think that we don't have 
BASEBALL goods, because we do 

PARKER HARDWARE CO. 



ATHENE HAS MEETING 

On Wednesday, April 9, Athene, 
which is the Academy girls' literary, 
invited the prospective members to 
join them in a hike to the brickyard 
canyon. Here a supper was served 
and a good time was enjoyed by all. 



CAMPUS DAY SEES BIG 

CLEAN-UP AT PACIFIC 



(Continued from page one) 



the committee is perhaps most proud 
of the fact that the study room 
doors have a fresh coat of white 
paint and are now ready for the us- 
ual coat of fingerprints. Upstairs 
in the Commercial department, the 
windows were washed, the wood- 
work washed, and as Miss Johnson 
said, everything washable was wash- 
ed. The typewriters were cleaned 
up and the books and papers on the 
shelves put in order. 

A great deal of appreciation has 
already been expressed for the work 
done on the athletic field under the 
leadership of Mr. Michener and Ivor 
Jones. The eye-sore which has been 
honored by the name "bleachers" 
"was torn down and the old tennis 
court backstops were taken down 
and moved over back of the ball 
field, making a more efficient back- 
stop behind home plate. The dia- 
mond was surveyed and remarked, 
home plate wa spalnted and new 
bases were made. A new pitcher's 
box was fixed up. the infield was 
scraped and the base lines were 
limed. Several sacks of sawdust 
were used up to mark off the 
coachers' lines. 

The Canyon committee did not re- 
port what they had accomplished, 
hut their work will probably be evi- 
dent to anyone who goes through the 



i canyon and notices the cleaning up 

! that was done down there. There is 
no doubt but that good work was 
done with Mr. Lewis and Howard 
Nottage to oversee. 

After the morning's work was fin- 
ished and the noon whistles began to 
blow, the workers discovered that 
another important committee hail 

1 ben making punch and chocolate. 

' Almost everyone brought his own 
lunch except in one or two instances 
where a whole committee had plan- 
ned to eat together. 

The baseball victory in the after- 
noon seemed to be a most fitting 

j climax to a day full of work and 
Play. 



! If the general run of men were 
. half as eager to slap their friends 
j on the back as they are to punch 

their enemies in the eye, friendship, 
I we opine, would prove a more en- 
| during possession, 
j A duffer's game at golf is rather 

to be chosen than great fame as a 
. champion at tiddledywinks. 
| No useful foodstuff has yet been 
, made from wild oats. 



AGORETON 

The Agoretons met last Monday 
evening and held a veiy interesting 
meeting. The program was preced- 
ed by a short business session in 
which the revision of the old con- 
stitution was discussed; it was final- 
ly agreed to appoint a committee to 
attend to the matter. 

The program opened with two 
solos by Hubert Armstrong. "Just 
a Song at Twilight," and "The Lit- 
tle Coon's Prayer." Mr. Hull played 
the accompaiments. A debate on So- 
cialism followed in which the af- 
firmative was taken by Gettmann 
and Hibbs. and the negative by Not- 
tage and Rinard. "Ye Poets" by 
Ben Darling ended the evening's en- 
tertainment. Mr. Hull acted a<< 
critic. 



MAY DAP FESTIVITIES 

PROMISE GREAT CHARM 



(Continued from page one) 



College is entering a float. 

After the parade, all will turn 
their steps toward the college ath- 
letic field to witness the coronation 
and drills. 

Spring, learning that Eva Miles 
is to be crowned Queen of May at 
the May Day festival given of the 
students of Pacific College and acad- 
emy, has sent abroad her messengers 



(Continued on page four) 



Newberg Graphic 

FINE PRINTING 

OF ALL KINDS 



C. J. BRELER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



KTENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 

Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 

Best of Bread: Finest Cakes. 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



NEWBERG LAUNDRY 

Good Work. Good Service. 

TRY US 



/ ~\ 

BOB WALKER 
Shoe Shine Parlor 

Ladies' Suede Shoes a Speciality 
CANDIES AND GUM 
STAGE DEPOT 



MICHELIN TIRES and TUBES 
VULCANIZING and REPAIRS 

DOYLE'S TIRE SHOP 

Phone Red 244 



You Name It and 
We Will Have It 

If it is something to eat or wear. 



Miller Mercantile Co. 



"Good Goods" 



A FORD 

Is what you want. Fords are 
what we have. Come in and take 
your pick. 

NEWBERG MOTOR CO. 
v. y 



DR. JOHN S. RANKER 
Physician & Surgeon 

Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171 
Office over TJ. S. National Bank 



E. C. BAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 
Phone Red 37 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



DR. A. M. DAVIS DIt. I. R. ROOT 

DENTISTS 

Over Ferguson's Drug Store 
Phone White 38 



A. C. SMITH 

Dealer in Leather Goods 
Auto Tops a Speciality 

703 First Street 



NEWBERG CYCLE COMPANY 

EARL HUTCHINSON, Prop. 

The Sporting Gocds Store 

Motorcycles, Bicycles, Supplies 
and Repairing 



A LIFE INSURANCE 

With accident Policy— Just what 
a student needs. 

MRS. MINNIE COOPER 
Resident Agent 1254 First St. 
We:t Coast Life Newberg, Or. 



Will B. Brooks 
Printer 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
Cleaning Pressing Repairing 

RYGG THE TAILOR 

PHONE BLACK 180 



EVANS 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

311 First Street 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

ELGIN VAN BLARICOM 



MAY DAY FESTIVITIES 

PROMISE GREAT CHARM 

(Continued from page three) 

and invited all the seasons to Par- 
ticipate in the drills given in the 
queen's honor. 

The seasons have responded hear- 
[ tily, and each has sent representa- 
tives to aid in the celebration. These 
representatives will meet together to 
portray in pageant form the "Pass 
ing of the Seasons." The complete 
program of the drills is as follows: 

1. The entrance of spring. 

2. Spring awakens the snow- 
drops, crocuses and daffodils. 

3. Summer roses. 

4. Autumn leaves. 

5. Sleigh bells. 

6. The return of spring. 

7. The winding of the May pole. 

8. Pyramid building. 
Practically every girl in school 

will have some part in the May Day 
drills. They have been putting in 
long hours of faithful practice, and 
a very beautiful program is predict- 
ed. Those taking part in the drills 
are: 

Spirits of spring: Ruth Campbell, 
Audrey Chenowerth, Esthei Gulley, 
Esther Gulley, Florence Heater, 
Thelma Rankin, Helen Rojbertson, 
Ethlyn Root. 

Spring: Johannah Gerretts. 
Snowdrops: Rosa Aebischer, Elsie 
Allen, Ruth Whitlock. 

Crocuses: Daisy Bisbee, Hilma 
Hendrickson, Olive Kendall. 

Daffodils: Esther Haworth, Hel- 
en Nordyke, Winona Smith. 
I Roses: Mildred Choate, Zelle Jus- 
j tice, Alice Laudien, Lela Pearson, 
| Lela Gulley, Fern Mardock, Bertha 
Tucker, Emmabelle Woodworth. 

Autumn Leaves: Alda Brown, 
Lelea Guley, Fern Mardock, Bertha 
I May Pennington, Elsie Reed, Hed- 
[ wig Schaad, Marie Scotten, La Vene 
I Wess. 

j Sleighbells: Bernice Carllslp, 
Alice Crozer, Rose Ellen Hale, Mar- 
garet Haug, Bernice Hinshaw, Ma- 
bel Kendall, Bernice Newhouse, Hel- 
en Nordyke. 

Those wJio wind the May Pole 
are: Blanch Carlisle, Mildred, 
Choate, Johannah Gerrits, Esthei 
Gulley, Esther Gulley, Gwendolyn 
Hanson, Alice Laudien, Leela Pear- 
son, May Pearson, Zella Straw, Re- 
tha Tucker, Emmabelle Woodworth. 

Following the drills one of the 
i gym classes will present some hu- 
l man pyramids. Eight or nine com- 
binations will be exhibited, which 
along with some special stunts, 
should be quite an asset to the fea- 
tures of May Day. The dare-devils 
consist of the following: Donald 
Schmeltzer, Vernon Woods, Harold 
Smith, George Foott, Philip Gatch, 
Roy Bisbee, Joseph Silver, Homer 
Nordyke, and Paul Brown, director. 

The afternoon will be equally as 
full, for as soon as picnic lunch on 
the college campus is over, tennis 
matches between P. C. and Linfield 
College will commence. The various 
matches will be ladies' and men's 
singles, ladies' and men's doubles, 
and mixed doubles. Last year hon- 
ors were divided between the two 
schools, and interesting tournaments 
are assured again this year. 

Perhaps the most exciting inci- 
dent of the day will be the baseball 
game between the old rivals, Lin- 
field College and Pacific College. 
Pacific will need the hearty support 
of the whole town if they win, for 
Linfield is coming "with blood in 
her eye." 

The last thing on the program 
will be the presentation by the col- 
lege student body of two one-act 
plays: "Tickless Time," and "The 
Neighbors," in the eveninc in Wood- 
Mar hall. The cast of these plays 
may be found in the Crescent of 
April 16. Proceedp form the eve- 
ning's entertainment will go toward 
removing the debts of the men's ath- 
letic association of Pacific College. 



You Get Your Money's Worth 
at the 
GEM BARBER SHOP 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

School Supplies and 
Stationery 

H. A. Cooley, Proprietor 



C. A. MORRIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



CAMPBELL'S 

CANDIES 



ALWAYS 



The Best 



W. H. BEST 

W. W. HOWETT 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

WATER METERS 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Deliver before and after school 
Phone Red 86 
MOORE & SON 



DR. THOS. W. HESTER 
Physician and Surgeon 

Office in Dixon Building 



NEWBERG, 



OREGON 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 

STORE OF QUALITY 



500 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



YOU WILL LIKE 
Our Shoe Repair Service 
Better and Better Each Day 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES 



Watches 



ClockB 



Jewelry 
E. G. REID 
Watch and Clock Repairing 

All Work Guaranteed 
906 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 
X-Ray Diagnosis 



OVER U. S. BANK 



GAS ADMINISTERED 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $125,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ESTBLISHED 1889 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



"Rosebud Flour" 

MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFACTORY